Tag Archives: vmware

Expand Logical Volume in Red Hat VMware

After adding a separate disk run to verify if the space was added:

  1. fdisk -l
  2. create a new partition fdisk /dev/sdb
    1. p – to print current partition table
    2. n – to create a new partition
    3. p – for primary
    4. 1 – depending on the output of the partition table output
    5. press return two times to accept the defaults (first and last sector)
    6. t – to change the system’s partition ID
    7. 8e – to change to Linux LVM
    8. w – to write the changes
  3. restart VM
  4. fdisk -l – to verify that partition was successfully created
  5. convert a partition to physical volume
    $ pvcreate /dev/sdb1
    Physical volume “/dev/sdb1” successfully created
  6. Extend current volume group
    vgextend rhel /dev/sdb1
    Volume group “rhel” successfully extended
  7. Run vgdisplay to verify if free space was added
    vgdisplay rhel | grep “Free”
    Free  PE / Size       4095 / 16.00 GiB
  8. extend logical volume with free space
    lvextend -l +100%FREE /dev/rhel/root
    Extending logical volume root to 66.00 GiB
    Logical volume root successfully resized
  9. Expand ext3 file system online inside of Logical Volume
    xfs_growfs /dev/rhel/root – Red Hat 7
    ext2online /dev/rhel/root
    resize2fs /dev/rhel/root

Setup Proxy in SUSE/VCSA

To setup proxy manually in VCSA 5.5 login as root and look into the following file:

/etc/sysconfig/proxy

PROXY_ENABLED=”yes”

HTTP_PROXY=”http://<IP address or FQDN>:<port_number>”

HTTPS_PROXY=”http://<IP address or FQDN>:<port_number>”

FTP_PROXY=”http://<IP address or FQDN>:<port_number>”

NO_PROXY=”localhost, 127.0.0.1″

 

If you need to authenticate via proxy

Create a file in your home directory,

/root/.curlrc with permissions 644

and contain the following:

# Proxy credentials

proxy-user = “<username>:<password>”

source the file to apply the changes

source /root/.curlrc

 

Constant RDP disconnects from Windows 2012 on VMware

Running Windows Server 2012 virtual machine on VMware ESXi hypervisor and receive constant disconnects through RDP.

Checked the logs and found out e1qexpress which indicates incompatibility of virtualNIC
Power down the machine, remove existing network interface and add a new one based on VMXNET3.
Bring the machine up and Windows should automatically apply the changes.

 

Windows machine gets suspended when inactive in VMware

Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows 10 get suspended or go to standby mode when are inactive for more than 5 mins. The issue is related to mobile devices which OSes were designed for and battery savings which disable some of the services such as RDP and users cannot login to machines.

In order to address the issue in VMware, a machine needs to be powered down and .vmx file needs to be modified. There are two ways of doing it:

  1. Directly via ssh and using text editor to append the following to <vm_name>.vmx file: suspend.disabled=”TRUE” save changes and exit file.
  2. Using vSphere Client by right clicking the machine and edit settings. Navigating to Options -> Advanced -> General and clicking ‘Configuration Parameters’ button. \
    1. Select ‘Add Row’ button.
    2. Name: suspend.disabled, Value: True
  3. Save settings and power the mahcine back on.

 

Incompatible device backing specified for device ’12’

While cloning one of my templates received the following error: “Incompatible device backing specified for device '12'.

VMWare tools were updated to the newest version and machine was powering on no problem.

To resolve the issue make sure that CD-ROM properties are set correctly.
“Edit the settings” of the virtual machine:
1) Remove the CD-ROM assigned as the device is probably pointing to some non-existing location,
2) If the device is set to Host Device change it to Client Device,
3) You may also want to try to point the device to some local ISO file if you find it easier.

How to verify if CPU is 64-bits compatible without a reboot

If you are running a HA machine and want to make sure that your hardware will support 64-bits guest operating system you can run the following command before rebooting machine and checking the BIOS option:

# esxcfg-info|grep "HV Support"

The output will determine if the machine is 64-bits compatible:

0 - VT/AMD-V indicates that support is not available for this hardware.
1 - VT/AMD-V indicates that VT or AMD-V might be available but it is not supported for this hardware.
2 - VT/AMD-V indicates that VT or AMD-V is available but is currently not enabled in the BIOS.
3 - VT/AMD-V indicates that VT or AMD-V is enabled in the BIOS and can be used.

More information here.